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August 5, 2019

It is rare that durning rehabilitation for pain (chiropractor or pysiotherapist) that stress is addressed.  Fear, threat to personal safety or well-being are psyiological responses to stress that evoke epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol secretion to encourage survival.  This is known as the 'fight-or-flight response'.  Cortisol is an anti-inflammatory that signals the stored glucose to be released for energy and to keep inflammation under control in order to prevent nerve and tissue damage.  Short term stress can adapt to pain and non-pain (nonmuscleskelatal like visceral pain) stressors to increase cortisol secretion.  Long term stress can create a cortisol dysfunction, pain and inflammation.  

The body responds to stress through the autonomic nervous system to signal organs to provide adjustments to keep the body operating in homeostasis.  The sympathetic nervous system will alter sweating, reflexes and increased heart rate as this whole s...

July 21, 2019

 Calcium gets more headlines, but magnesium is more important.  Bones contain 60%, muscle cells 26% and the rest is in fluids and soft tissue cells.  It has a important role in protein formation, cellular replication, energy production for brain, liver, kidney and heart.  Magnesium is the activator of the sodium-potassium pump (sodium out of cells and potassium in) which plays a big role in blood pressure stabilization.  Did you know that magnesium is refered to as "nature's calcium channel blocker"?  It is able to block calcium from entering heart muscle cells and vascular smooth muscles.  Too much calcium in these areas can cause fatty plaque to harden, which is called atherosclerosis.  This increases your chances of heart disease and a heart attack.  The proper amount of daily magnesium can help lower blood pressure, better working heart and reduce vascular resistance.  Supplementation might be the answer for you if you are not getting enough magnesium from your food....

 There are many great uses for essential oils, but ingesting them can be very dangerous.  This type of oil is not diluted, therefore making them super concentrated.  This makes them extremely damaging to kidneys, liver, digestive system and can be very toxic.  Adding essential oil to your water does not dilute the substance as we know oil and water don't mix.  The oil remains on top of the water making it a separate componet from the water.  This can lead to burning of mouth, esophagus and stomach tissue due to the high concentration.  These effects of ingesting essential oils may not be experienced imediately, but over time organs can be effected.  This is similar to people who ingest excess sugar, processed foods, alcohol or smoke.  They can experience long term effects.  Dr. Alan Woolf defines the toxicology of essential oils as "any of a class of voltile oils composed of a mixture of complex hydrocarbons (usually terpenes) and other chemicals extracted from a plant, usually by a me...

December 29, 2018

 I hear many times the answer to 'what is Canadian food" to be Canadian bacon, maple syrup, poutine and beaver tails.  Being a history major and a chef for many years, I can tell you that Canadian food is more than that.  It is interesting to know that every province has its own traditional Thanksgiving dinner that consists of foods that are natural and plentiful to each province, as it is a celebration feast for a good harvest.  During the medieval period in rural England is where this tradition among the farmers began.  The celebration in Canada began way before the official day was declared.  When Europeans arrived in Canada, they witnessed First Nations giving thanks to to their Sacred Mother for their harvest.  The Iroquois' feast lasted 3 days where they honoured the three sisters.  Three sisters soup was one of their feast items that consisted of corn, beans and squash.  This is definitely a soup worth trying or making for your feast.  Not only is this soup a taste bud sensation...

December 19, 2018

Many drugs can be life saving, but they can deplete certain nutrients from your body.  It is important to replenish these nutrients by increasing your levels through supplements.  Food provides our nutrients, although the level of food intake could be excessively high because food quality is not the same as it was 70 years ago.  A comparison study of 43 fruits and vegetables from 1950-1999 indicated a decrease in protein (6%), calcium (16%), phosphorus (9%), iron (15%), riboflavin -B2 (38%) and ascorbic acid - vitamin C (20%).  The quality of food is changing due to factors of genetic selection and some are modified for shelf life or crop yield.  Storage time, environmental pollution and fertilization can effect nutrients.  A study in 2004 showed the tomato can lose 13% of its ascorbic acid within 5 days.  Even organic can be low in nutrients because the soil can be low in potassium, phophorus or nitrogen which are key growing nutrients.  Plants can be grown in potassium rich soil with...

December 4, 2018

The symptoms that your stomach isn't functioning optimally are:

1.    Nausea

2.    Vomiting

3.    Diarrhea

4.    Heartburn

5.    Indigestion

6.    Belching

7.    Gas

8.    Bloat

9.    Appetite

10.  Ulcer

The stomach muscles make the stomach "churn" just the same as a washing machine does when in motion, so the stomach can create acid digestive juices to assimilate protein.  Also, it creates mucous to protect the stomach from acidic fluid.  An important part of the digestive process is your intestinal flora because it aids in the digestive process by making B vitamins and healing chemicals for the large intestine that delay bad bacteria from developing.  Absorption and digestion of nutrients are improved as lactic acid is created.  Intestinal flora help the intestine with peristalsis  (intestine muscles involuntarily relax and constrict to create a movement that pushes feces along the canal).  After intestinal flora die, they provide much of the bulk of...

November 10, 2018

Antibiotic translates to “against life” (anti-against bios-life) and defined as a chemical substance that is destructive or inhibitory to micro-orginisms that is produced or derived through a low concentration of living organisms.  Pasteur and Joubert were credited in 1877 for observing air contaminants were capable of destroying anthrax bacillus cultures.  In 1929, Sir Alexander Fleming discovered antibacterial activity stems (by accident) from the lytic action on a plate of staphylococci and air-borne mold. 

Some antibiotics interfere with growth and reproduction whereas some are protoplasmic poisons, but the result is the death of the organism or the organism surrenders to the body’s natural defense.  It wasn’t until 1940 that Chain, Dlorey and their Oxford University associates validated the possibilities of penicillin in medicine.

The first antibiotic to be produced commercially by chemical synthesis was Chloroamphenicol. 

Originally, all antibiotics were obtained bios...

October 7, 2018

 What can legumes do for you?

1.  They are a soluble fibre that helps keep LDL blood levels down, glucose levels in    check and help lower blood pressure. 

2.  Legumes are an insoluble fibre too, which means better bowel function, helps with some digestive issues and can possibly prevent colon cancer.  

3.  They are loaded with complex carbohydrates that keep energy levels up.  

4.  Provide ample supply of B vitamins, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc and magnesium.

5.  They are only short one or two amino acids of being a complete protein.  Just couple them with rice, nuts or grains to make a complete protein.  Essential amino acids are the build blocks for muscles and for repair.

6.  They contain phytochemicals, which are health benefits to slow tumor growth (phytosterols), lower breast and ovarian cancer risk (isoflavones) and stop cancer cells from multiplying (saponins).

Key nutrients in different legumes:

1.  Cranberry bean - protein...

September 7, 2018

 You have all heard that a normal blood pressure is 120/80.  what exactly does this mean? The top number is systolic the measure of pressure on your arteries when the heart is contracting.  The bottom number is called diastolic, which is measured pressure in-between beats of your heart pumping blood.  With high blood pressure, the systolic number being higher than 120 and diastolic being higher than 80 you risk hypertension.  An elevated blood pressure is 120-129 over 80 or lower.

Mild hypertension =130-139 over 80-89  

Moderate hypertension =140 - 159 over 90 or higher 

Severe hypertension = 160 or higher over 115 or higher

To lower blood pressure naturally, here are a few things that should be on your "to do" list:

1.  Eliminate sodium chloride intake (salt) to a maximum 1500mg which is 1/4 teaspoon.

2.  Follow a high potassium diet with 3500-4700mg of potassium per day.

3.  Your diet should be high fibre with complex carbohydrates.

4.  Include a celery, fr...

August 3, 2018

Pickling vegetables is a great way to preserve and get the benefits from fermented food.  Good bacteria changes a cucumber into a pickle, and other vegetables can be pickled too.  My boys love dill picked beans and carrots.  

Dill Brine:

2 cups of water

2 1/2 cups of distilled white vinegar

3 cloves of garlic

1/4 cup salt

1 tsp dry dill

Sterilize jars and lids by boiling in hot water or steaming for 10 minutes.  Pack jars with fresh dill sprig and vegetable of choice (onions, cauliflower, asparagus, cucumber, beans, carrots, zucchini).  Make sure they are packed tight, so the vegetables don't float to the top and risk being exposed to the air gap at the top of the jar.  Bring brine to a boil and add to jars (1/8 of an inch from the top).  Your pickled vegetables should be ready in 4-6 weeks.  Make sure you place them in a cool, dark place.

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Janette de Vries, RHN, B.ed, (Hons) B.A

Registered Holistic  Nutritionist

© 2017 and beyond 

 

Orillia, Ontario

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